What it takes to make change

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On November 8th 2016, Donald J. Trump was selected as the president elect of the United States, effectively marking the end of a continuously heated year of harsh campaigning. Alongside the Executive branch being handed to Republicans, the House of Representatives and the Senate have coextensively been flipped to Republican control. With a Republican Legislative and Executive branch also comes the likelihood of a conservative Justice being appointed to the Supreme Court, handing the Republicans a majority in the Judicial branch as well. Ultimately, it comes down to the fact that there will be drastic change within this nation, and it is the responsibility of each individual to fight for what they believe in.
While many of us hold citizenship in the United States, few of us hold the constitutional right to vote. It is commonly portrayed that voting is the only action you can take to make change, thus implying that those who cannot yet vote are powerless. However, this concept of students holding no potential for change is merely a myth.
Voting is simply a tool that, like any other ordinary tool, makes a given task easier to accomplish. In this case, it is a tool which is used to make change. It is still plausible to say that change is possible without the aid of such tool. In fact, what really makes change happen is self perseverance in regards to an issue of interest. It is how passionate you fight for your values which brings about change. It is getting involved in change. It is the subsequent sacrifice. Being involved in change is more powerful than the lone act of voting. And that is something which everyone has the potential to accomplish.
Getting involved does not simply mean to complain. Unfortunately, complaining alone does not bring about change. The people responsible for making change, and the people who fight to make change, will not look twice at your social media rants. It may be inspiring to talk the talk, but it will be revolutionary to walk the walk.
“Write letters to your representatives. Find organizations in your community. And read about issues – don’t fall for false rhetoric!” says Becky Breitwieser, an English Language instructor at CCHS. In addition, Breitwieser stressed the importance of not living life in fear. “We do have power. We have tremendous power. If [our generation] gets involved, we will have incredible power. And the lawmakers and corporations know it.”
To get involved means to speak out against unjust laws while maintaining civil order. It means to support your community in a positive manner. Because at the end of the day, the common goal of every individual seeking change is to make the lives of others better. Many people, myself included, will be in the battlefield to make change. Will you be a part of change?